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Part III – Female Sexual Abusers: Who are They?

January 13th, 2010  |  // ShareThis

By Roni Weisberg-Ross, L.M.F.T., Abuse Topic Expert Contributor

Part three of a three part series of articles.

There weren’t a lot of statistics, because no one thought it was a problem. But then in 1990, Ramsay–Klawsnick found that adult females were abusers of male adolescents 37% of the time and of female adolescents 19% of the time; and in six studies reviewed by Russell and FInkelhor, female perpetrators accounted for 25% or more of those abused. In 1996, The National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect conducted a widespread investigation on the maltreatment of children. Of the three million children investigated, more than one million were identified as victims of abuse and of the one million, 12% were sexually abused. The sexual abuse of children by women, primarily mothers, once thought to be so rare that it could be ignored, constituted 25% (approximately 36,000 children) of the sexually abused victims. Furthermore, all of these statistics are likely underestimated because victims of this type of abuse rarely disclose. Finally, there is an alarmingly high rate of sexual abuse by females in the backgrounds of rapists, sex offenders and sexually aggressive men – 59% (Petrovich and Templer, 1984), 66% (Groth, 1979) and 80% (Briere and Smiljanich, 1993).

Why haven’t we, as a society, been aware of this problem? Most probably because women have been idealized as mothers and nurturers. They haven’t been viewed as sexual aggressors. And because they are caretakers and are expected to be emotional, warm and physical with children, no one notices or suspects them. Sexual abuse by women is rarely reported because their victims usually are their own children – who are dependent on them. Furthermore, these children either do not understand what is happening to them or do not think anyone will believe them. And for male victims, there is additional embarrassment and denial – they must have wanted it – men (boys) can’t be raped!

But women can be sexual aggressors. And even though the abuse they are capable of doesn’t conjure up violent images of attack and penetration, surveys show that women are capable of a different type of violence toward their victims, sometimes physical and almost always psychological and verbal. This abuse can penetrate the psyches of their victims more deeply because they are the one person who was never supposed to betray them.

What type of woman would betray her own child or another person’s child in such a manner and why? A profile of a female sexual abuser looks something like this: She would probably be a person with low self-esteem who may have had a history of severe emotional and verbal abuse and/or been a victim of childhood sexual abuse herself. In fact, a study by Fowler et al in 1983 maintained that 80% of incest offenders had been sexually or physically abused as children. There would be feelings of alienation and isolation and possibly the loss of a spouse or other adult partner. She might have a history of drug or alcohol abuse and less often a history of indiscriminate or compulsive sexual activity. There might be arrested psychosexual development; there might be a need to have power and control in some aspect of her life. But the common perception that any woman who does this has to be mentally insane is false. Only a minority of female abusers do not pass reality-testing measures. How the abuse takes place and with who may differ, but the personality type can be constructed from the above profile.

David Finkelhor, who has written extensively on this subject, maintains that there is a Four Factor Model, or to put it another way, there are four components that contribute in different degrees to child molestation:

1. Emotional Congruence – a satisfaction of emotional needs through the abuse of a child that is due to either arrested psychosexual development, immaturity or low self-esteem.
2. Sexual Arousal – probably due to familial conditioning through their own childhood abuse or early fantasy reinforced by masturbation.
3. Blockage – Age appropriate sexual opportunities have been cut off by either a traumatic sexual experience with an adult, sexual dysfunction, limited social skills or a marital disturbance such as the loss of a spouse. The latter has been described as a “Theory of Loss” phenomenon precipitating abuse.
4. Disinhibition – due to poor impulse control either because of substance abuse, a chaotic family background or psychotic mental illness.

There are women who are pedophiles and simply pursue children for the sex, but the female abuser usually falls into one of three categories:

1. Predisposed Offender – the abuser was herself abused as a child and she continues the generational pattern by abusing her own children. It is thought that she becomes an offender in an effort to resolve her own childhood sexual trauma.
2. The Teacher/Lover – she generally becomes involved with an adolescent male with whom she relates to as a peer. She may be looking for non-threatening emotional intimacy.
3. The Male-Coerced Offender – she is being led by an abusive male who she is extremely dependent upon. But she may eventually initiate sexual abuse on her own.

While the public is periodically shocked into awareness by sensational revelations of the second and third type of female abuser (i.e. Hedda Nussbaum, Mary-Kay Latourneau), it is the first type that we have to finally give a face to – she is the one that is quietly victimizing thousands of young children who have nowhere to turn for safety. And the children ARE young. Studies have concluded that women abusers victimize younger children than male abusers – probably because of their role as caretakers. If current research is correct and more female than male children are sexually abused, then it is logical to conclude that more girls may grow up to be sexual offenders themselves and there may be a significantly larger number of female sexual abusers than we had previously imagined.

It is up to us to put aside deep-rooted myths about females, and more specifically mothers, in order to deal with the widespread problem of child abuse and more accurately expose all types of child sexual abusers.

©Copyright 2010 by Roni Weisberg-Ross L.M.F.T. All Rights Reserved. Permission to publish granted to GoodTherapy.org. The following article was solely written and edited by the author named above. The views and opinions expressed are not necessarily shared by GoodTherapy.org. Questions or concerns about the following article can be directed to the author or posted as a comment to this blog entry. Click here to contact Roni and/or see her GoodTherapy.org Profile

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Tuesday, September 22, 2009
Mothers commit vast majority of parental murders of children
Although the data is U.S. sourced there are similarities in English speaking western democracies. Click on the link below for the source data.

Federal Data: Mothers commit vast majority of parental murders of children

These data are not blips. The trend is clear over many years that the mother (female) is responsible for the greatest amount of child abuse and child murder in family relationships. How then can it be there is no tax supported DV or emergency shelters for men in Canada; how can it be there are few, if any, (I haven’t found any yet) tax supported counseling services for men in marital breakdown in Canada; how can it be woman’s groups can tap into such large amounts of tax support to send out propaganda about how vulnerable they are; how can these DV groups spout the invective they do against men when their own clients are the worst perpetrators of abuse to children.

How many women are actually in these shelters because of DV; how many are in them for addictions; how many are planning a false ex parte order to nail hubby while he sleeps; how many are in there because they are hiding from legal pursuits of them; how many are “passing through” while traveling. I think an accounting and operational audit of these facilities should be part and parcel of their ability to obtain tax funds. There is no doubt some women are there because they have no recourse and are subject to abuse but it casts a pall over them if many are there for other reasons. They are emergency shelters – so called – for Domestic Violence – at least in terms of the marketing of them to get tax funding.

Is there something wrong with our values? Is there something wrong with government largess and what is wrong with us men for laying down and taking this misinformation from groups like the Tennessee DV coalition as described here amongst many others.

Figure 3-3 Victimization Rates by Age and Sex, 2007 Child Maltreatment 2007

Victimization Rates by Age and Sex, 2007

This bar graph breaks the victim population into age groups as follows: Less than 1, 1, 2, 3, 4–7, 8–11, 12–15, and 16–17 and either boy or girl sex. According to this graph, the youngest age group is the most victimized, with a rate of 22.2 boys and 21.5 girls per 1,000 children of the same age and sex group. The oldest children were victimized the least frequently.

Victims by Perpetrator Relationship, 2007

This pie chart presents victims by relationship to their perpetrators. More than 80 percent (80.1%) of victims were maltreated by at least one parent. Nearly 40 percent (38.7%) of victims were maltreated by their mother acting on her own.

Note the rate by mom and other is 44.4% while dad and other is 18.8%. The rate by the mother is 2.36 times higher than dad. That is 236% greater. Now how to explain that away to those who believe only men are abusive.MJM

Table 4-5 Perpetrator Relationships to Child Fatalities, 2007 Child Maltreatment 2007

Relationship to Child Child Fatalities
Number Percent
PARENT Blank Cell
Mother 347 27.1
Mother and Other 96 7.5
Father 208 16.3
Father and Other 11 0.9
Mother and Father 232 18.1
NONPARENT Blank Cell
Daycare Staff 24 1.9
Foster Parent (Female Relative) 0 0.0
Foster Parent (Male Relative) 0 0.0
Foster Parent (Nonrelative) 3 0.2
Foster Parent (Unknown Relationship) 3 0.2
Friend or Neighbor 2 0.2
Legal Guardian (Female) 0 0.0
Legal Guardian (Male) 0 0.0
More than One Nonparental Perpetrator 52 4.1
Other Professional 2 0.2
Partner of Parent (Female) 4 0.3
Partner of Parent (Male) 35 2.7
Relative (Female) 29 2.3
Relative (Male) 20 1.6
Staff Group Home 2 0.2
Unknown or Missing 210 16.4
Total 1,280 Blank Cell
Percent Blank Cell 100.0

Perpetrator Relationships to Child Fatalities, 2007
This table first lists perpetrator relationships including mother, mother and father, father, mother and other, father and other, female daycare staff, more than one nonparental perpetrator, unknown, etc. In the next column is listed the number of child fatalities from the specified perpetrator. The third column lists the percentage. More than 27 percent (27.1%) of child fatalities were perpetrated by a mother acting alone.

Moms and another are more than twice as likely to kill a child as a dad and another.MJM

Figure 4-2 Fatality Rates by Age and Sex, 2007
Child Maltreatment 2007

Fatality Rates by Age and Sex, 2007

Fatality Rates by Age and Sex, 2007

This bar graph shows two groupings of victims, one for boys and one for girls. Each grouping displays the fatality rates for each sex by age group. The graph indicates that the youngest children have the highest fatality rates for both sexes.

Note boys have the higher death rates.MJM

Some data on child abuse from Child Maltreatment 2006, a report by the Federal Administration for Children & Families…
Figure 4-2 Perpetrator Relationships of Child Fatalities, 2006
Child Maltreatment 2006

Perpetrator Relationships of Child Fatalities, 2006
Perpetrator Relationships of Child Fatalities, 2006
This pie chart indicates that 27.4 percent of child fatalities were perpetrated by the mother acting alone. Such non-parental perpetrators as daycare providers, foster parents, or residential facility staff were responsible for 14.6 percent of fatalities.

Leaving aside killings by non-parents or by mothers and fathers acting together, mothers committed a significantly greater number of the parental murders of children.

Figure 3-5 Victims by Perpetrator Relationship, 2006
Victims by Perpetrator Relationship, 2006
Victims by Perpetrator Relationship, 2006
This pie chart shows that 39.9 percent of child victims were maltreated by their mothers acting alone; another 17.6 percent were maltreated by their fathers acting alone; 17.8 percent were abused by both their mother and father. Victims abused by a nonparental perpetrator accounted for 10.0 percent.

Table 4-5 Perpetrator Relationships to Child Fatalities, 2006
Child Maltreatment 2006
Relationship to Child Child Fatalities
Number Percent
Mother 288 27.4
Mother and Other 121 11.5
Father 138 13.1
Father and Other 16 1.5
Mother and Father 235 22.4
Female Relative 31 3.0
Male Relative 17 1.6
Female Foster Parent (Relative) 0 0.0
Male Foster Parent (Relative) 0 0.0
Female Partner of Parent 0 0.0
Male Partner of Parent 30 2.9
Female Legal Guardian 1 0.1
Male Legal Guardian 0 0.0
Foster Parent (Nonrelative) 5 0.5
Foster Parent Unknown Relationship 4 0.4
Staff Group Home 4 0.4
Daycare Staff 32 3.0
Other Professional 0 0.0
Friend or Neighbor 2 0.2
More than One Nonparental Perpetrator 26 2.5
Unknown or Missing 100 9.5
Total 1,050 Blank Cell
Blank Cell Blank Cell 100.0
Based on data from 36 States.
Perpetrator Relationships to Child Fatalities, 2006
This table first lists perpetrator relationships including mother, mother and father, father, mother and other, father and other, female daycare staff, more than one nonparental perpetrator, unknown, etc. In the next column is listed the number of child fatalities from the specified perpetrator. The third column lists the percentage. More than 27 percent (27.4%) of child fatalities were perpetrated by a mother acting alone.

The following are data from 2005.

Figure 4-2 Perpetrator Relationships of Child Fatalities, 2005
Child Maltreatment 2005
Figure 4-2

Note the mother (female) again is responsible for the vast majority of deaths of children.

Table 4-5 Perpetrator Relationships of Fatalities, 2005
Child Maltreatment 2005
Blank Cell Child Fatalities
Perpetrator Number Percent
Mother 287 28.5
Mother and Other 104 10.3
Father 159 15.8
Father and Other 16 1.6
Mother and Father 205 20.4
Famale Relative 24 2.4
Male Relative 7 0.7
Female Foster Parent (Relative) 0 0.0
Male Foster Parent (Relative) 0 0.0
Female Partner of Parent 6 0.6
Male Partner of Parent 33 3.3
Female Legal Guardian 1 0.1
Male Legal Guardian 0 0.0
Female Foster Parent (Nonrelative) 5 0.5
Male Foster Parent (Nonrelative) 1 0.1
Female Foster Parent
Unknown Relationship 1 0.1
Male Foster Parent
Unknown Relationship 0 0.0
Female Staff Group Home 0 0.0
Male Staff Group Home 0 0.0
Female Daycare Staff 20 2.0
Male Daycare Staff 2 0.2
Female Other Professional 0 0.0
Male Other Professional 1 0.1
Female Friend or Neighbor 2 0.2
Male Friend or Neighbor 4 0.4
More than One Nonparental
Perpetrator 23 2.3
Unknown or Missing 105 10.4
Total 1,006 blank cell
Percent blank cell 100.0

Based on data from 34 States.
Perpetrator Relationships of Child Fatalities, 2005
This table first lists perpetrator relationships including mother only, mother and father, father only, mother and other, father and other, female daycare staff, more than one nonparental perpetrator, unknown, etc. In the next column is listed the number of child fatalities from the specified perpetrator. The third column lists the percentage. 28.5 percent of child fatalities were perpetrated by a mother acting alone.

“According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ new report Child Maltreatment 2004, when one parent is acting without the involvement of the other parent, mothers are almost three times as likely to kill their children as fathers are, and are more than twice as likely to abuse them.”
Source: Child Maltreatment 2004, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. According to Figure 4-2 “Perpetrator Relationships of Fatalities, 2004 Child Maltreatment 2004” here, child fatalities perpetrated by mothers or by “mother and other [not father]” comprise 40.6% of all child fatalities. Figure 4-2 also shows that fatalities perpetrated by fathers or by “father and other [not mother]” comprise 15.6% of all child fatalities. According to Figure 3-6 “Victims by Perpetrator Relationship, 2004 Child Maltreatment 2004,” here child abuse perpetrated by mothers or by “mother and other [not father]” comprise 45.6% of all child abuse. Figure 3-6 also shows that abuse perpetrated by fathers or by “father and other [not mother]” comprise 19.5% of all child abuse.
at 9/22/2009 11:14:00 PM
Labels: 2007, child abuse, child fatalties, child maltreatment 2006, perpetrator relationships

Female Predators..They live among us!

endenfin's picture

They are real, they live among us and they will emotionally scar your little boy for life.. The movie industry has always picture the relationships woman-teenager as something to brag about, the idea of a young boy having sex with an experimented woman appears to turn some audiences on. However in a recent study Dr. Eric Hickey, PH.D. (Director of the Center for Forensic Studies – Alliant International University) describes this experience as follows: “Boys seduced by female teachers predators will usually experience long term trauma that affects their self-esteem, sense of security, and trust levels with others. A 13 year old boy will seldom grow up thinking how cool that was to have sex with his teacher, especially as they begin to understand terms such as sexual assault and child rape. Sexual violation of a child is traumatic regardless of who commits the act”. The truth is that female predators are not limited to the famous story of Mary Kay LeTourneau, the teacher that seduced her student and gave birth to his kids. Female predators could be a close friend of the family, one of his Little friend’s mothers, could be just anyone! These women are usually emotionally immature and seeking for a relationship. Some of them might have been sexually abused on their early years and are not capable to develop a normal relationship with a man their age. According to studies, 95% of predators are males and female predators are more likely to cease on his predatorial seek after being released from prison. 25 years ago, women who would had sexual relations with a minor were considered mentally sick and were sent for physiquiatric treatment only. Today, a female predator will go to prison and spend as much as a male predator depending on her crime. And how does a female predator looks like? Unfortunately, they look just like anyone of us! They are young and old, any race, and the majority or them are good looking which is a plus for them attracting young boys who, at first feel flattered because “a woman like that” is flirting with them. They will bragg with their friends and go on secret dates which will become more and more demanding by the female predator. These women want to be sexually satisfied and will treat their victims as a mature man seeking for protection and love. They will be jealous of their friends and even other teenage girls that could approach their prey. These females will do anything to keep their victims! From threatening with suicide if they leave them, to bribe them with all kind of gifts and even money. They are like a spider guarding their prey. Of course the parents of the victim are their worse enemy and the female predator will do anything on her power to turn the young boy against them to the point to make him run away from home and go to live with her. FIRST SIGNS – Look for unexplained mood changes whenever he comes back from school, don’t be afraid to ask your child even if he gets even moodier. – Establish an honest and rulesless channel of communication with your kids, predators hate that! – Meet his teachers and make sure you know all his friends and parents, don’t hesitate to ask for references. – Be aware of long periods of time chating on the Internet, your are the parent and you have the right to check on his conversations. – Place the computer in the living room or any other place where he, she won’t have much privacy. The video conversations today are full of predators chating with their victims inviting them to expose themselves in front of the camera. – If you have a gut feeling about someone approaching your son with too much interest, whatch out! Just remember this that it is not normal for an adult to want to spend all her or his free time with someone else’s child. – Check on his cellular phone conversations, you pay the bill right? Well you check it regularly and find out what numbers appear on that statment and who these numbers belong to. You will be amazed! – Check the predator’s list in your area! Although most of female predators have not yet been discovered, some of them already appear at the FDLE web sight http://www.fdle.state.fl.us/static.index.html. Another useful web sight is the http://www.familywatchdog.us/ where you can log in and even request to be warned via e-mail when a sexual predator or sex offender moves too close to your neighborhood. Awarness and prevention are usually the most effective weapons against these criminals: use them! It is always better than deal with a traumatized child for the rest of your life.

Female Predators..They live among us! | Jacksonville.com.

Women Who Speak Out For Men

Barbara Kay

With Special Guests:

There are many passionate and committed women working hard to improve the lives of men and boys in the arenas of men’s health, fatherhood, boys’ education, domestic violence, divorce and separation, and the many other areas we cover regularly on our program. It is regularly observed in this post-feminist era of political correctness that the voice of a woman can often be worth that of a hundred men. This week on Dads on the Air we interview two North American women who have the courage to speak up on behalf of men and boys. Barbara Kay was a frequent contributor of op/eds, book reviews and humour pieces to the National Post, a Canadian national newspaper based in Toronto. She became a regular Comment page columnist for the newspaper in September, 2003. Her refreshingly direct, brave and honest columns have regularly covered issues of concern to men and boys. Often shunning the political correctness adopted by many of her media colleagues, Kay’s articles have been widely circulated amongst the international men’s and fathers’ movement for being genuinely sympathetic to the lived experience of so many males in the West. Some examples of her writing include

Here’s a short passage from The plight of divorced dads:

“Of the myriad forms of discrimination men cite, one looms over the rest: The egregious treatment meted out to fathers in the throes of contested child custody following the “no-fault” divorces most of them did not initiate or desire. My files bulge with stories of disenfranchised fathers ripped from their children’s arms and lives. They have lost their homes, their careers, fortunes, friends and reputations, often on the basis of false allegations of abuse (for which their female accusers are virtually never punished). I wouldn’t mention such anecdotal evidence, if the anguish in these testimonials didn’t jibe with objective data confirming the shameful gender bias that dominates the family law system.

“About half of all marriages end in divorce. Women are twice as likely to initiate a divorce as men, largely because they can be fairly sure they’ll end up with control of the children. Where shared parenting is the default template, divorce rates plummet. Men are six times as likely as women to commit suicide within the first two years after a separation: That they kill themselves from despair rather than their ex-wives for revenge is, ironically, a tragically eloquent rebuttal to the feminist credo that men are inherently dangerous to women. Although 25% of women make more money than their spouses, 97% of support payers are men (even in cases of shared parenting). Mobility decisions favour women: The psychological comfort to a Vancouver mother of moving near her Toronto-based family will be privileged over the psychological devastation the virtual loss of his children causes the Vancouver-bound father.

“Misandry in family law begins with an ideology that views children as the property of women, even though many peer-reviewed studies show children want and need both parents, and no studies show sole parenting by a mother serves children’s best interests. This ideology is instilled in judges during training sessions featuring feminism-driven materials, and subsequently often plays out as unaccountable kangaroo courts. The result is that an adversarial mother who initiates a divorce against the will of the father – however indifferent her parenting skills, however superb his and even if the children spend their days with nannies or day care workers – pretty well has a lock on sole custody of the children. If she denies rightful access to the father, she will never be punished at all. Conversely, if he withholds money, he will be criminalized: His picture as a “deadbeat dad” may appear on government-sanctioned Internet sites, and if he goes to jail, as is likely, he will serve a longer sentence than cocaine dealers.”

The US Boys and Schools program is dedicated to improving the lives and futures of boys. Their outreach efforts focus on raising public awareness regarding issues related to boys’ health and achievement. They offer tools and resources that can help make a change in boys’ lives. The Boys and Schools program is a project of the Men’s Health Network, a non-profit educational organization committed to improving the health and well-being of men and boys. Malia Blom is the director of the Boys and Schools program, who lives and works in Alexandria, Virginia, with her husband James, and her two sons, Andy and Magnus. Blom gave an excellent presentation at last year’s Boys and the Boy Crisis conference in Washington DC, and it will be a pleasure to have her on Dads on the Air to talk about the crisis facing boys and young men in the US education system, and the excellent strategies being supported by Boys and Schools. Some of the examples of the strategies supported by the Boys and Schools program include:

  • More research regarding boys’ developmental needs and learning styles, and greater public awareness of these differences
  • Early intervention as a means to develop literacy skills and a positive attitude about school
  • Mentoring, and greater parental and community involvement.
  • More flexibility for educators in trying different techniques to reach boys
  • Better efforts to meet the mental health needs of boys
  • Educating policy makers about the need for specialized programs to boost boys’ educational outcomes
  • Creating a culture of support for boys.

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Dads on the Air – Show Archives – Women Who Speak Out For Men.

12:05 PM

Iowa Woman, Kourtney Babcock, Charged With Sexually Abusing 12-Year-Old Boys

September 25th 2009

A 19-year-old woman from southeast Iowa faces sexual abuse charges in a case involving two boys.

The Des Moines County sheriff’s office says Kourtney Babcock, (pictured left) of rural Yarmouth, was arrested on Wednesday on three counts of third-degree sexual abuse. She’s accused of having sexual contact with two 12-year-old boys at a house in Mediapolis.

The investigation began in July.

Babcock was in the Des Moines County jail in Burlington on Friday on bond of $30,000. Jail officials didn’t know if she had an attorney.

http://www.kcrg.com/news/local/61452732.html

http://www.whotv.com/news/sns-ap-ia–iowasexualabuse,0,2715867.story

http://www.kcci.com/news/21113345/detail.html

To Catch A Female Predator: Iowa Woman, Kourtney Babcock, Charged With Sexually Abusing 12-Year-Old Boys.

Long Term Effects of Sexual Abuse by a Female

In a recent case in Texas a defense attorney, according to the media, made the following statement (the victim was 13):

Winfield told jurors that if given probation, Cosgrove would not be a risk, and that the boy enjoyed the attentions of an older woman and was not traumatized.

“It’s different with boys and girls,” she said. “I don’t believe he’s going to be scarred for life.” – Read the entire article here

Comments like that are all to common in cases like that. In another case an attorney said “In my opinion he’s an advanced 14-year-old,”. Comments like these and others are simply wrong and offensive. Because I am seeing more and more reported comments like this I wanted to look at parts of a study that talked about the long term effects of sexual abuse by females. It has some interesting points that I would like to highlight (note all emphasis is mine):

The Long-Term Effects of Child Sexual Abuse by Female Perpetrators: A Qualitative Study of Male and Female Victims
Myriam S. Denov
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Oct 2004; vol. 19: pp. 1137 – 1156

Despite the minimal research dedicated to addressing the long-term effects of female sexual abuse on victims, emerging studies have revealed that the general public and professionals working in the area of child welfare perceive sexual abuse by women as relatively harmless as compared to sexual abuse by men. Broussard, Wagner, and Kazelskis (1991) asked 180 female and 180 male undergraduates their perceptions of the effects of child sexual abuse on the victim. Participants tended to view the interaction of a male victim with a female perpetrator as less representative of child sexual abuse. They also believed that male victims of female offenders would experience less harm than if the victim was a woman or girl and the offender was a man. Similarly, Finkelhor (1984) found that his survey participants tended to view the sexual offenses of women as relatively insignificant. When he asked 521 parents about the seriousness of different types of sexual abuse, they rated adult female perpetrators’ actions with male and female victims as less abusive than those of adult male perpetrators with male or female victims.

Now this might be expected of the lay person but professionals who work in the area of child welfare should know better. But then again think of how many of these professionals have the mother present when they are asking questions about sexual abuse to a child. How many of them even think to ask if the child has been sexually abused by a woman?

Research on professional attitudes to different types of sexual abuse reveals comparable perceptions to those of the general public. For example,Hetherton and Beardsall (1998) identified gender biases in the decisions of socialworkers and police working in child protection. The authors presented police officers and social workers with identical case vignettes of sexual abuse involving either a male or female perpetrator. Both professional groups considered that social service involvement and investigation were less warranted when the perpetrator was a woman. Case registration and imprisonmentof the male perpetrator was considered more important by both professional groups. Denov’s (2001) research explored psychiatrists’ and police perspectives on female sex offending. The study found that both professional groups viewed sexual abuse by women as less harmful than sexual abuse by men. Moreover, efforts were made by psychiatrists and police officers, either consciously or unconsciously, to transform the female sex offender and her offense, realigning them with more culturally acceptable notions of female behavior. This ultimately led to a denial of the problem.
And this group of professionals should know better also. Because of this many people who do mention they have been sexually abused by a woman are disbelieved or are told they are mistaken.

If you want to see how this denial plays out just look at one label that is used for some female sexual offenders. They are called Teacher/Lover. Yet there is no corresponding label for male offenders. Is it not offensive to call someone who sexually assaulted a child a “lover”? I do not think it would go over well if they tried to put that label on some male offenders.

This next piece is very important:

The professional assumption that sexual abuse by women is less harmful than similar abuse by men has potentially dangerous implications for victims of sexual abuse by women and their offenders. If professionals fail to recognize sexual abuse by women as potentially serious and harmful, child protection plans will not be made. Consequently, children in the care of or in contact with a female sex offender may be at risk and remain outside of the realm of professional attention and statutory intervention. In addition, such professional belief systems may work to diminish the level of harm inflicted on the victim. As a result, the experiences of victims who come forward to disclose sexual abuse by women may be trivialized, leading to delayed referral to social services, or failing to provide victims with the care and the necessary support services that they require (Hunter, 1990; Denov, 2004). Moreover, professional minimization or disbelief of victims’ allegations of female perpetrated sexual abuse may actually exacerbate the negative effects of the sexual abuse, ultimately inciting secondary victimization (Denov, 2003b). In a similar vein, female sex offenders who are perceived by professionals as largely innocuous will not be held accountable for their actions and may be allowed to drop out of the child welfare and/or criminal justice system without warrant. In such circumstances, female abusers will not gain insight into their behavior and may continue to pose a risk to children.
This next part looked at some of the data from the study:
The average age of onset of the female sexual abuse was age 5 and ended, on average, at age 12, with the average duration being 6 years. 36% reported being sexually abused more than once per week, 21% reported being abused once per week; 29% reported being abused once per month. 14% reported a single incident of abuse.

In total, 64% reported severe sexual abuse, while 71% reported moderate sexual abuse. 100% reported experiencing mild sexual abuse.

93% reported that the sexual abuse was highly damaging and difficult to recover from:

However, all of the victims who reported sexual abuse by men and women declared that the sexual abuse by women was more harmful and more damaging than the sexual abuse by men.

For example, one female participant, whose father attempted sexual intercourse with her at age 5 and had intercourse and oral sex with her until the age of 11, reported that her father’s actions were the least invasive of all the sexual abuse that she had experienced. To her, the sexual abuse by her mother and her grandmother was far more traumatic:

The [sexual abuse] done by my father was the least invasive. . . . The abuse by the females had far more of an effect on me than he did. . . . When looking at the big picture and the layers of hurt . . . out of all that happened to me, what my mother did was the absolute worst . . . far worse than what my father had done.

There is a deeper sense of betrayal [with a female perpetrator]. It’s like there’s no safe place. How can a woman face a world that belittles and condemns us because we’re women . . . and still turn her hand against her own sex? That’s a bitter betrayal.

100% reported a strong mistrust of women as a result of the sexual abuse experience.

29% reported having sexually abused children at some point in their lives. The men were charged and convicted. The sexual abuse by the women was never reported.

What about when MOM is the abuser?: Long Term Effects of Sexual Abuse by a Female.

Woman who left toddlers alone pleads guilty

Gary Grado, Tribune

September 17, 2009 – 8:41AM , updated: September 17, 2009 – 8:59AM

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Samantha Abernathy

A Mesa woman who left her two small children alone in the middle of the night has pleaded guilty to child abuse.

Under the terms of the plea deal, Samantha Abernathy will be on probation for 16 years and spend up to a year in Maricopa County Jail if the court chooses probation. The court could also send her to state prison for up to 18 months, according to state sentencing laws.

Abernathy pleaded guilty Friday.

According to Mesa police, a neighbor in an apartment complex at University Drive and Gilbert Road called police when Abernathy’s two boys, ages 1 and 3, were wandering around at 7:40 a.m. on June 14.

Abernathy told police she left the boys at 2 a.m. to go across town to visit her boyfriend.

Police found the apartment in filthy condition and the boys hungry. One of the children reached for dog food as police were investigating.

investigating.

Woman who left toddlers alone pleads guilty | Arizona local news – Chandler, Gilbert, Mesa, Queen Creek, Phoenix, Scottsdale | eastvalleytribune.com | eastvalleytribune.com.


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